Every day, countless emails are sent. Unfortunately, whether it is for personal or business purposes, some email recipients view emails as spam because of their contents and the sender’s approach.

So what exactly is email etiquette?

Email etiquette refers to the norms of behavior that people use when sending, receiving, and replying to an email. Email etiquette also includes any cultural or social rules that affect communication via email.

For example, in Korea, specific Korean honorifics may be used during an exchange over email; however, these same honorifics might be considered rude if used in another country such as America.

Similarly, with email marketing, there are different guidelines for sending promotional emails versus editorial emails. Promotional emails are sent out for marketing purposes, while editorial emails are usually sent out for information purposes.

When sending an email, one has to consider who they are writing to and their perspective culture, countries/states laws, political correctness vs. incorrectness, what the email will be used for (promotional or informational), how formal it should be, etc.

On the other hand, when receiving an email, one must consider all of these things before reacting or replying to it. In addition, some people get annoyed if a sender asks too many personal questions in the “from” field of an email.

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Why is email etiquette important?

Email etiquette is essential for a few reasons. It helps keep business emails organized and relevant, it saves someone’s time by not including unnecessary information, and it also keeps the sender from sounding desperate or rude.

What are some email etiquette rules?

Some email etiquette rules include not putting the entire contents of an email into the quote, keeping it to two or three sentences for a reply, capitalizing the first letter only in your reply’s subject line, using ‘reply all’ sparingly, including a signature after your physical signature (e.g., name, phone number), and sending attachments as .pdfs or other files instead of embedded within the email body. In addition, many people prefer to receive emails from someone with their first and last name as opposed to “John Smith” or something else generic.

In business, establishing ground rules for clients is essential so both parties know what they can expect from each other. When working with new clients, email etiquette may also include asking them about their preferred form of communication, whether they want to be cc-ed on emails, and if they would like daily weekly, or monthly email updates.

On the other hand, if someone receives an email from a client specifically for informational purposes (e.g., where to meet for lunch), it’s usually not necessary to reply to every sentence in the sender’s email but instead respond with one or two sentences.

An excellent way to make sure your emails are relevant and organized is by using categories. Categories can include ‘action items,’ ‘to do,’ ’email follow-ups in progress,’ etc.

This way, all of your essential will be stored in one place, and you can quickly move them from one category to another should the need arise.

A great way to ensure that your emails are relevant is by using categories. Categories include ‘action items,’ ‘to do,’ ’email follow-ups in progress,’ etc. This way, all of your essential will be stored in one place, and you can quickly move them from one category to another should the need arise.

Emails don’t have any set rules because there are no standard conventions for email communication. But understanding a bit of email etiquette goes a long way- especially when you know who you’re sending it to and what purpose they’ll use it for.

What makes proper email etiquette?

Good email etiquette is being respectful and considerate of the reader’s time. It means being polite, not sending too many messages in a row, not spamming them with your product or service, and following the golden rule of trying to be as good an email sender as you’d want to receive.

Good email etiquette is being respectful and considerate of the receiver’s time. It means being polite, not sending too many messages in a row, not spamming them with your product or service, and following the golden rule by trying to be as good an email sender as you’d want to receive.

What is email etiquette for marketers?

Some email etiquette rules for marketers are to always include a call-to-action in your emails, no matter how small, i.e., ‘click here,’ provide value in every email you send out, have an email signature at the end of your message with contact information about who’s sending the email, send personalized messages that are relevant based on what you know about your client or audience member’s preferences or past purchases.

For example, if you know your client likes red shoes, don’t send them an email about blue shoes (or vice versa)- instead, send them information about why they might like the red ones better.

Some email etiquette rules for marketers are to always include a call-to-action in your emails, no matter how small, i.e., ‘click here,’ provide value in every email you send out by having an email signature at the end of your message with contact information about who’s sending the email, sending personalized messages that are relevant based on what you know about your client or audience member’s preferences or past purchases.

For example, if you know your client likes red shoes, don’t send them an email about blue shoes (or vice versa)- instead, send them information about why they might like the red ones better.


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What is email etiquette for clients?

Client email etiquette includes being respectful of their busy schedule by keeping your emails relevant and not sending multiple messages in a row without an appropriate response from them, as well as providing value with every email you send out. For example, if you know your client likes red shoes, don’t send them an email about blue shoes (or vice versa)—instead, send them information about why they might like the red ones better. Also, make sure to include links where they can go to unsubscribe from your emails whenever it’s necessary.

Client email etiquette includes being respectful of their busy schedule by keeping your relevant and not sending multiple messages in a row without a response from them, as well as providing value with every email you send out. For example, if you know your client likes red shoes, don’t send them an email about blue shoes (or vice versa)—instead, send them information about why they might like the red ones better. Also, make sure to include links where they can go to unsubscribe from your emails whenever it’s necessary.

What are some other examples of good email etiquette?

  • Here are some other examples of good email etiquette:
  • Do not use ALL CAPS
  • Do not use too many exclamation points or emoticons!
  • Send messages in HTML format when possible, not just plain text.
  • If someone asks to be unsubscribed from your mailing list, honor their request.
  • Do not overload your email messages with links.

Summary

Email etiquette is an essential aspect of email marketing and can make a difference in the success of your business. Following the golden rule and keeping your emails relevant, give each party what they’re looking for: you get to keep communicating with your audience, and prospects get to stay up-to-date on information that might be relevant to them without feeling overwhelmed or bombarded by emails that aren’t about their interests.

Author

A data-driven professional with more than 10 years of experience in digital marketing, SEO, PPC, automation, and so on. Privately tea lover, gamer, tech nerd, and traveler. I love writing about marketing!

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